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Early Modern Studies after the Digital Turn

The essays collected in this volume address the digital humanities’ core tensions: fast and slow; surficial and nuanced; quantitative and qualitative. Scholars design algorithms and projects to process, aggregate, encode, and regularize historical texts and artifacts in order to position them for new and further interpretations. Every essay in this book is concerned with the human-machine dynamic, as it bears on early modern research objects and methods. The interpretive work in these pages and in the online projects discussed orients us toward the extensible future of early modern scholarship after the digital turn.

LAURA ESTILL is an Associate Professor of English at Texas A&M University, where she edits the World Shakespeare Bibliography (worldshakesbib.org) and DEx: A Database of Dramatic Extracts. Her recent publications include Dramatic Ex­tracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Chang­ing Plays (2015) and articles in Shakespeare Quarterly, Digital Literary Studies, and Shakespeare and Textual Studies.

DIANE K. JAKACKI is Digital Scholarship Coordinator and Affiliated Faculty in Com­parative Humanities at Bucknell University. Her research specialties include the digital humanities and early modern British literature and drama. She is editing Henry VIII for the Internet Shakespeare Editions and The Shoemaker’s Holiday for Broadview Press. Articles and essays have appeared in Early Theatre, Medieval and Renaissance Drama, and Doing Digital Humanities.

MICHAEL ULLYOT is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Calgary, who researches and teaches early modern literature and the digital humanities. He has published articles on anecdotes, abridgements, and Edmund Spenser. Current projects include a monograph on the rhetoric of exemplarity and a pro­gram that detects rhetorical figures of repetition and variation in literary texts (http://acriticismlab.org).

The essays collected in this volume address the digital humanities’ core tensions: fast and slow; surficial and nuanced; quantitative and qualitative. Scholars design algorithms and projects to process, aggregate, encode, and regularize historical texts and artifacts in order to position them for new and further interpretations. Every essay in this book is concerned with the human-machine dynamic, as it bears on early modern research objects and methods. The interpretive work in these pages and in the online projects discussed orients us toward the extensible future of early modern scholarsh...

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book Details

  • Page Count:

    378 pages

  • Publication Year:

    2016

  • Publisher:

    Iter and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Series:

    • Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 502
    • New Technologies in Medieval and Renaissance Studies 6

Ebook

USD$ 69.95 ISBN 978-0-86698-725-7 Order Ebook

Print

USD$ 69.95 ISBN 978-0-86698-557-4 Order Print Book
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